Pineapple Teriyaki Chicken

This week has gone by so fast for me! I’m finally getting around to editing photos and getting some posts up. I feel like I’m so far behind! I have missed reading my favorite blogs, and I plan to catch up on that this weekend.

I’ve been going through a lot of my recipes to see if I can deem them low oxalate. I have made this chicken many times; we really like it. I’m not sure if this is an ideal dish for a low oxalate diet. The soy sauce is on my list of foods to avoid, but I figured using just low sodium would be fine.Besides, I dilute it with pineapple juice, which is on my “good” list. 😉

I’ve made this with fresh pineapple and canned. Canned is obviously less work and tastes just as good. I really love sweet and spicy combinations. Don’t substitute cooking sherry for the dry sherry, they are different and cooking sherry is loaded with sodium (which is bad for a low oxalate diet). I have grilled it, cooked it in a skillet, and one time I even just tossed everything in an 8×8″ glass dish and baked it at 375F. Just depends on my mood, and how tired/lazy I’m feeling.

You can serve this with rice, couscous, millet, almost any grain. I chose orzo since it’s a pasta, which is on my “good” oxalate list.

Pineapple Teriyaki Chicken
Printer-friendly recipe
serves 2

1/3 c dry sherry (NOT cooking sherry. I bought a cheap bottle of dry sherry at Trader Joe’s)
¼ c low-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons brown sugar
~1 Tbl Hoisin sauce
½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1 20-ounce can pineapple chunks, reserve juice from the can
2 large boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon butter

Whisk sherry, soy sauce, brown sugar hoisin sauce, red pepper flakes and 1/3 cup pineapple juice in shallow dish or Ziploc quart sized bag. Add pineapple chicken and gently stir to coat. Refrigerate for at least 15 minutes. I mix this up in the morning, put it in a Ziploc bag and let it marinate until dinner, flipping occasionally.

Meanwhile, preheat grill or skillet to medium-high.

Remove the chicken from the marinade and pat dry; reserve the marinade. Oil the skillet or grill rack. Cook the chicken cooked through, ~8 minutes per side.

Pour the reserved pineapple chunks marinade in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring occasionally about 5 minutes or so (this will kill the bacteria from the raw chicken). Taste and adjust seasonings as necessary. Sometimes I like to add more pineapple juice. Add 1 tsp cold water to the cornstarch and stir, to make a slurry. Pour into marinade, stir, bring to a boil and stir until thickened. Stir in butter (this is optional. I need the fat so I add it).

Serve the chicken drizzled with pineapple sauce.

Lemon Glazed Brown Sugar Shortbread

I have to admit, this low oxalate diet is one of the hardest elimination diets I have ever done. Mostly because all my favorite foods are on the “foods to avoid” list. But, this forces me to become more creative in planning out my meals. I’m thinking of ingredient combinations I never would have considered otherwise. I wanted to tap into my creative side via this blog, and now I’m really being forced into it.

One thing I’m really struggling with is dessert. Ever since losing too much weight, my doctor keeps encouraging me to eat sugary, fatty desserts. And now I’ve developed a sweet tooth. I can’t help it; you try eating cakes and browines, cookies and ice cream everyday for a year, then all of a sudden being cut off. My biggest challenge right now is finding low oxalate desserts. Is there anything that tastes like chocolate, but isn’t chocolate nor cocoa, and would be low oxalate? If someone knows of something please let me know. It’s only been about a week and I’m craving and missing my good friend chocolate terribly.

Since I haven’t been feeling well lately, I wanted to make an easy dessert. I decided to make a simple shortbread and add a lemon glaze to sweeten it. I made a small batch because this was an experiment, and now I wish I had made more. I’ve already eaten almost half the batch I made. Luckily, these are so easy to make I can make a bigger batch tomorrow. The lemon glaze adds that perfect extra ‘something’.

I’d like to experiment more with this by adding different spices and glazes. I’d like to try some kind of orange blossom water glaze. This is a great basic, recipe to play around with.

Lemon Glazed Brown Sugar Shortbread
Printer-friendly version
makes about 12-14 bite sized cookies

for the shortbread:
4 Tbl butter, softened
2 Tbl brown sugar
½ c flour

for the lemon glaze:
2 Tbl powdered sugar
1 tsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
¼ tsp vanilla

Make the shortbread:
Preheat oven to 300F

In a mixing bowl, cream together butter and sugar. Gradually add the flour, mixing well. On a lightly floured surface, knead and squeeze together the dough. Pat it into a rectangle, I think mine was about ½“ thick. Using a pizza cutter, or knife, cut into desired size pieces.

Place pieces on a parchment or silicone lined baking sheet and prick with a fork. Bake about 15 minutes, or til bottom and edges are browned. Place baking sheet on wire rack.

Make the glaze:
In small bowl (I used a ramekin) add glaze ingredients and whisk until smooth. Using a pastry brush, brush glaze on still warm shortbread (or you could drizzle the glaze over the shortbread).

Allow shortbread to cool completely before storing in airtight container.

Chai Biscotti

Well, my low oxalate diet has begun. It’s going to take some time to fully adjust to it, and I have to reference my “good”, “bad”, and “limit” lists. Black tea is on my “foods to avoid” list, so my daily cup of chai tea (made from black tea) is out. So I had to find a new way to get my chai fix. I’ve been thinking a lot about biscotti recently, I’m not sure why, so I decided to try to come up with some kind of chai flavor biscotti. I wanted to make them vegan, and that took some adjusting to make sure the texture came out right.

It took a few attempts to get the right flavor ratio and dry to liquid ratio. The almonds are on my list of “bad” foods, but I figured ¼ c of thin slices spread throughout the whole loaf wouldn’t be too harmful for my diet. And flax is on my “limit” list, and I figure 2 Tbl is limiting.

I made a small batch, because I wasn’t sure if Mr. Surly would be into eating them. It’s a nice treat, and for me, it was the right amount. But feel free to double the recipe if you’re really into biscotti.

Chai Biscotti
Printer-friendly recipe
makes ~8 pieces

2 Tbl ground flaxseed meal
6Tbl water
2 Tbl flaxseed oil (or canola oil)
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 c flour
¼ c sugar
½ tsp baking powder
pinch salt
½ tsp cardamom
½ tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp ginger
¼ tsp ground cloves
¼ tsp freshly (or ground) nutmeg
pinch white pepper (opt)
¼ c sliced almonds, toasted

Preheat oven to 350 F

Add ground flaxseed and water to a mixing bowl, whisk to combine. Add oil and extract. Sift in the dry ingredients (flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and spices). Add almonds and stir to just combine.

Line a baking sheet with silicone liner or parchment paper. Shape the dough into a loose rectangular shape. Bake 25 min, flipping sheet halfway through baking time, until the loaf is firm and golden brown.

Remove loaf to cutting board. Reduce oven to 300 F.

Using a serrated slice loaf into biscotti sticks.

Place sticks, cut side up, on baking sheet and return to the oven for 15 minutes more.

Place on wire rack to cool completely. Store in airtight container.

*Note: you can replace the ground flaxseed and water with 2 eggs

7 More Facts

I got tagged for a 7 facts award by Meg over at Cooking.In.College. I have previously shared 7 facts about myself so here are some more:

1) I used to be a fastpitch softball pitcher. I started working out with a pitching coach in 6th grade and pitched through high school. I turned down college scholarship offers because I injured my rotator cuff and had to quit throwing a softball all together.

2) My favorite, everyday dresses are by susana monaco. They are comfortable, cute, flattering dresses. I adore them, the fabric, the fit, the colors, the styles. I enjoy adding each spring to my growing collection.

3) I’m an obsessive list maker. I have lists of food I want to make, things I need to buy from the store, movies I want to watch, books I want to read, things I need to clean, errands I need to run, etc. I even have a packing list on my computer I print out for vacations. I love the sense of accomplishment I get each time I check an item off my list.

4) I heart Target; I go there every Tuesday whether I need anything or not (with a list, of course, of things I need or want to look for).

5) I’m jumpy and startle easily. Growing up my sister and brother took full advantage of this and were merciless in hiding and jumping out at me. Even Mr. Surly enjoys giving me a good rush of adrenaline from time to time.

6) One of the reasons I started this blog was to tap into my creative side. Being a science major in college sucked all the creativity out of me.

7) Some of the movies I watch over and over and never tire of are:

To Catch a Thief
Gone With the Wind
Star Wars: Return of the Jedi
The Godfather and Godfather Part II (is there anyone who even likes part III?)
The Seven Year Itch
Dumb and Dumber
Scoop
The Usual Suspects

Here are the rules:
Link to the person who awarded you
-List 7 random facts about yourself
-Pass the award on to 7 other bloggers

Here are my choices:
Claire Cooks
Greens and Chocolate
Indulge
Sitting Pretty
The Girly Girly Cooks
The Scene From Me
Wanna Be a Country Cleaver

**Carmi, you better do this! No procrastinating.**

Homemade Granola Bars

I’ve had this recipe bookmarked for awhile. I really like the idea of making my own granola bars. I’ve been on a muesli kick for awhile now, and decided it was time to make some granola. I usually keep granola bars in my purse when I have to go to the hospital for doctor appointments and tests, since I’m usually sitting around forever, waiting. I’m in love with the white chocolate macadamia Luna bars. These homemade bars are a much healthier option. I suppose I could have added some melted chocolate to these, but they are so good on their own. They remind me of the Two Moms in the Raw bars they sell at Starbucks and Nordstrom’s snack bar, I love the gojiberry one. Have you ever had one of these bars? They are delicious, and I’m so glad my granola bars taste very similar to them.

I’m glad to have another product that I can now make myself so I don’t have to buy a prepacked version. Can you tell I’m obsessed about controlling what goes in my food? When you have abdominal issues, this becomes a must.

Another plus is how easy these are to make. I haven’t had much energy the past couple weeks, but these came together rather quickly. These bars were plenty sweet for me, since I don’t eat much sugar, but if you like things sweet I’d stir in more (up to 1/4 c brown sugar). I sprinkled brown sugar on top to give the tops of the bars a bit of a sweet, sugar crunch.

Granola Bars
Printer-friendly recipe
Yield: about 16 bars

2 c rolled oats
½ c chopped almonds
½ c chopped walnuts
½ c uncooked quinoa
½ c shredded coconut (I used ¼ c dried coconut)
2 Tbl ground flaxseed meal
2/3 cup honey, agave or combo of both
1 ½ tsp vanilla
2-3 Tbl flaxseed oil
pinch kosher salt
¼-½ tsp cinnamon
pinch freshly grated nutmeg
1 ½ c chopped dried fruit, or a mix of your favorite dried fruit (I chopped up dried apricots, and tossed in dried cranberries and pomegranate seeds)
~2 Tbl brown sugar

Preheat your oven to 350F.

Toss the oatmeal, nuts, quinoa, coconut, and flaxseed meal together on a 9 x 13” baking sheet or dish (I used a 9 x 13”cake pan). Bake 10 to 12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until toasted and lightly browned.

Reduce oven to 300F.

While oats are toasting, combine honey, vanilla, flaxseed oil, salt and spices in the bottom of a large bowl. Whisk to combine. Pour in toasted oats and stir with a spatula to moisten. Stir in dried fruit.

Line your baking sheet or dish with parchment paper or grease with nonstick spray (I used the same cake pan and lined it with parchment paper; one less dish to dirty).

Pour the oat and fruit mixture into prepared baking dish and press down firmly to pack down the mixture as much as possible. Sprinkle brown sugar over the top.

Bake at 300F ~30 minutes until mixture is golden brown. Allow to cool a few hours before cutting into bars or squares. Store in airtight container at room temperature. Or freeze. I wrapped mine in cling wrap, popped them in a freezer bag and froze the bars so we could grab them as needed, they don’t take long to thaw.

Source: adapted from Smitten Kitchen

White Chocolate Macadamia Cookies

This week has been incredibly busy for me; full of errands and appointments. It’s been pretty stressful, therefore I decided I needed a special treat; I went with my favorite cookies.

A few years ago, I worked with a girl named Zara. She was from Sri Lanka and was (and is) the most genuinely nicest person I have ever met to date. I never saw her upset, nor even irritated. She would often bring some kind of baked treat to our meetings; cupcakes, cookies, etc. One day she brought these cookies. I think they were gone within 10 minutes. Everyone loved them and no one could stop eating them. I begged her for the recipe and, lucky for me, she gave me a copy. Thank you, Zara, for the best cookie I’ve ever eaten.

Be careful if you make these, you won’t be able to stop eating them.

Zara’s White Chocolate Macadamia Cookies
Printer-friendly recipe
Yeild: 3 dozen cookies

1 c flour
½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
½ c (1 stick) butter, softened
½ c packed dark brown sugar
¼ c granulated sugar
1 large egg
1 tsp vanilla
¾ c chopped unsalted macadamia nuts (rinsed and dried if salted)
6 oz bittersweet chocolate, chopped (or ~1 c chips)
6 oz white chocolate, chopped (or ~1 c chips)

Preheat oven to 375 F

Sift together flour, salt, and baking soda; set aside. In large bowl cream butter and both sugars. Add egg and vanilla, beat well. Slowly beat in flour mixture in 2 additions. Stir in nuts and chocolate with wooden spoon. Shape into balls on ungreased baking sheet 2 in apart. Bake 8-10 min, til edges are lightly browned. Cool 2 min on baking sheet, then transfer to wire rack to cool completely.

Triple Layer Cheesecake

I have wanted to make this cheesecake for a long time. I was just waiting until all the Christmas treats were gone. This recipe is courtesy of my grandma. Recently, I inherited all her recipes. After she passed away in 2007 they originally went to my aunt. A couple months ago I was craving my Grammy’s roast beef; it was her signature dish. Anytime I went to visit her (which was often) she would make it for me. I never thought to ask her for the recipe. Therefore, I emailed my aunt, asking if she knew how to make this delectable roast beef. Lucky for me she did. That email was all the incentive my aunt needed as an excuse to bring me over a box containing all Grammy’s recipes. My aunt was looking for someone to pass these recipes along to the “next generation” she said, and since I was the first to inquire about a recipe, and she lives near me, she gave me the whole stash; a whole treasure trove of recipes for me to sift through at my leisure.
Some of the recipes are typed, some handwritten, others were clipped from various newspapers ranging anywhere from 1941-2004. I came across this cheesecake and stopped. I don’t remember my grandmother ever making cheesecake. So this recipe intrigued me. I wondered where (or from whom) the recipe came and if Grammy had ever made it. It sounded rich and decadent, exactly the thing to curb my recent chocolate craving.

Since there are only two of us, I reduced the recipe by 1/3 to make one small, 4 ½ inch cheesecake. I’m so glad I didn’t make the full amount, this cheesecake is so rich that I could only eat a small sliver. Each of us had a piece and there is still ¾ of the cheesecake remaining, but we both agreed this was really, really good. If you want a full-sized, 9 inch cheesecake, multiply the ingredients by three scroll to the bottom of the post. I have a sneaking suspicion that this is not going to last much longer in our fridge.

Triple Layer Cheesecake
Printer-friendly Recipe
Yeild: one 4 ½ inch cheesecake

crust:
¾ c chocolate cookie crumbs (~6 oreo cookies)
1 Tbl butter, melted
dash cinnamon

filling:
1 pkg (8oz) cream cheese
¼ c sugar
1 Tbl + 2 (generous) tsp yogurt
1 Tbl flour
¼ tsp vanilla
1 egg
2 oz (~1/3 c) peanut butter chips
2 oz (~1/3 c) dark chocolate chips
2 oz (~1/3 c) white chocolate chips

for the crust:
Preheat oven to 350 F.

Grease the bottom and sides of a 4 ½ inch springform pan. If desired, line the bottom with parchment paper and grease.

Combine ingredients, pat into prepared pan. I used the bottom of a glass to smash it down. Bake 7-1o minutes at 375F.

for the cheesecake:
Reduce oven to 300F

Beat cream cheese and sugar until creamy. Then mix in yogurt, flour, and vanilla. Beat in egg to combine.
Set aside.

Melt the peanut butter chips in a bowl, in 3o second intervals until melted, stirring in between. Set aside. Repeat for the dark chocolate and white chocolate, melting each kind in its own bowl.

Divide the cream cheese mixture evenly among all three bowls of melted chips.

Pour the peanut butter chip and cream cheese mixture into the crust. Using a rubber spatula, smooth out the layer, making it as even as possible. Top that layer with the dark chocolate mixture, the follow with the white chocolate, spreading and smoothing each layer.

Bake 35-45 minutes, until top is golden, edges are set and center moves slightly. Remove to wire rack to cool 10 minutes. Run a sharp knife around edge of pan, allow to set for 1 hour. Remove from springform pan to serving dish.

Add 2 Tbl of each chip into its own snack sized Ziploc bag. Seal the bags and microwave 20-30 sec, and massage bag to ensure all chips are melted. Once melted, snip a small hole in the corner of one bag and drizzle over cheesecake. Repeat for the remaining two bags of melted chips. Refrigerate til serving.

NOTE: due to popular demand, click here for the 9″ cheesecake recipe

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls

I was excited to make these rolls. It’s originally from Alton Brown and I like his simple, minimal-effort, yummy recipes. I have been planning on making them since November. I originally wanted to serve them for breakfast on Thanksgiving, but with all the other cooking I was doing these got pushed aside. The recipe has been sitting on the kitchen counte ever since, just calling out to be made. Finally, I made them. All I have to say is Wow! These are beyond incredible. So much better than Cinnabon, because they aren’t as sugary and they don’t give you an instant cavity.

It’s nice to be able to control the amount of sweetness. I added walnuts for additional fat, omega 3s, and slight crunch. Mr. Surly approved as well. We also liked that they weren’t too sugary-sweet and you could put as much (or as little) icing on as desired. I will definitely be making these again. It wasn’t a lot of work, just be sure to plan ahead to give the rolls time to rise overnight.

Overnight Cinnamon Rolls
Printer-friendly recipe
Yield: ~12 cinnamon rolls

for the dough:
4 large egg yolks, room temp
1 large whole egg, room temp
1/4 cup sugar
6 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
3/4 cup buttermilk, room temp
20 oz flour (~4 cups), plus additional for dusting
1 pkg (2¼ tsp) instant dry yeast
1 ¼ tsp kosher salt
Vegetable oil or cooking spray

for the filling:
1 1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 1/4 Tbsp ground cinnamon
pinch salt
2 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
(generous) ¼ c finely chopped walnuts

for the icing*:
2-3 Tbsp milk
1 cup powdered sugar
~ ½ tsp lemon juice (opt)

make the dough:
In a large bowl, whisk the egg yolks, whole egg, sugar, butter, and buttermilk. Add ~2 cups of the flour along with the yeast and salt; whisk until moistened and combined. Add all but ¾ cup of the remaining flour and knead on low speed for 5 minutes. Check the consistency of the dough, add more flour if necessary; the dough should be soft and moist but not sticky. Knead/stir until the dough clears the side of the bowl. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface; knead by hand ~30 seconds. Lightly oil a large bowl with cooking spray. Transfer the dough to the bowl, lightly spray the top of the dough with olive oil cooking spray, cover and let double in volume, 2 to 2 ½ hours.

make the filling:
Combine the brown sugar, cinnamon and salt in a medium bowl. Mix until well incorporated. Set aside until ready to use.

to assemble:
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Gently shape the dough into a rectangle with the long side nearest you. Roll into an 18×12 inch rectangle. Brush the dough with a bit of melted butter, leaving a ¾ inch border along the top edge. Sprinkle the filling mixture over the dough, leaving a ¾-inch border along the top edge; gently press the filling into the dough. Beginning with the long edge nearest you, roll the dough into a tight cylinder. Firmly pinch the seam to seal and roll the cylinder seam side down. Very gently squeeze the cylinder to create even thickness. Using a serrated knife, slice the cylinder into 1 ½ -inch rolls. (I only sliced 6 rolls, and froze the rest of the dough). Arrange rolls cut side down in a buttered/greased baking dish; cover tightly with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator overnight or up to 16 hours.

to bake:
Remove the rolls from the refrigerator and place in an oven that is turned off. Fill a shallow pan 2/3-full of boiling water and set on the rack below the rolls. Close the oven door, allow the rolls rise until they look slightly puffy; ~30 minutes. Remove the rolls and the shallow pan of water from the oven.

Preheat the oven to 350 F.

Place the rolls on the middle rack and bake until golden brown (or til the internal temperature reaches 190F) ~25-30 minutes.

While the rolls are cooling slightly, make the icing* by whisking ingredients until smooth. Spread over the rolls and serve immediately.

*note: since I only baked about half the rolls, I just added ½ c powdered sugar with 3 ½ tsp milk and ½ tsp fresh lemon juice.

Source: slightly adapted from Confections of a Foodie Bride, originally from Food Network

Macadamia Fudge

I love chocolate but I’m not a big fan of fudge. I think it’s because I feel like eating fudge is a waste of calories; I’d rather just eat a square of dark chocolate.

I don’t have a go-to fudge recipe since I don’t eat it so I started looking around for recipes. I admit I was nervous, especially after all the trouble I had last week with the mint recipe. Most of the simple and easy recipes called for a jar of marshmallow fluff or mini marshmallows. I detest marshmallows and marshmallow fluff; way too sweet and sugary for my taste. I found it difficult to find an easy fudge recipe that did not include this stuff. I learned in my recipe research that fudge gets its smooth consistency from careful temperature monitoring. For people who don’t want to fiddle around with a candy thermometer to maintain the perfect fudge cooking temperature, marshmallow fluff is the secret to smoothness. So what about people, like me, who don’t want to deal with a candy thermometer nor add a jar of marshmallow fluff?

There had to be a recipe out there for me so I kept searching for a fudge that sounded appealing. I finally settled on this marshmallow fluff-free recipe. It turned out to be pretty good, a bit on the sweet side, but still good. Using evaporated milk instead of sweetened condensed milk might cut down on the sweetness factor. I ended up making a full batch and froze some. Though, at the rate that Mr. Surly is eating them up, the frozen ones might not last much longer.

Tonight I head north to the city of Brotherly Love for the next week and a half to be with family for Christmas. I envision myself snuggled up on the couch, watching movies while being attended to by worried, loving family members. It will be wonderful to be coddled and made much of. Though I’m not looking forward to cold temps and snow.

Macadamia Fudge
Printer-friendly recipe
yield: ~2 lbs

18 oz semisweet chocolate (~3 c chocolate chips)
1 can (14 oz) can sweetened condensed milk
pinch salt
5 oz (~1 c) chopped macadamia nuts
1 ½ tsp vanilla
butter, for greasing the dish

Line an 8×8 inch square pan with foil. Grease the foil with butter, set aside.

Melt the chocolate, milk, and pinch salt, either on the stove over low heat, or in the microwave in 30 sec intervals. I combined them in a 4 qt glass measuring cup and melted in the microwave.

Once chocolate is melted, stir in the vanilla and nuts. Pour into prepared pan and chill until firm (~2 hrs).

Lift foil out of pan; peel away from fudge. Cut into bite-sized squares. Store in airtight container.

Source: Taste of Home’s Best Loved Cookies and Candies 2010

Pumpkin Bourbon French Toast

Another tasty treat inspired by Mr. Bobby Flay.

For Thanksgiving I wanted to have something more than just my boring oatmeal and Mr. Surly’s fruit smoothie for breakfast. I love french toast and found myself with ½ can of pumpkin that needed used. I decided to make some pumpkin flavored french toast. It turned out to be so delicious. I cooked up the whole loaf of bread, knowing that we wouldn’t eat it all at once. It was nice to have enough breakfast for 2 days. Just pop a couple slices in the microwave or oven the next morning for a no hassle, quick breakfast.

Pumpkin Bourbon French Toast
Printer-friendly version
serves 4-6

1 loaf brioche bread
½ can (~7.5 oz) pumpkin puree
2 c half-n-half (or milk, or combo of both)
4 eggs
1 Tbl sugar
2 Tbl bourbon
1 tsp vanilla (I used Trader Joe’s bourbon vanilla)
1 tsp cinnamon
pinch freshly grated nutmeg
½ tsp pumpkin pie spice

Slice the bread into thick slices and arrange in a 9 x 13 inch baking dish. Set aside.

Whisk together eggs, sugar, and pinch of salt in small bowl or 4 qt measuring cup. Add the rest of the ingredients and whisk until well combined. Pour over bread slices. Using tongs or your fingers turn each slice to coat well in the liquid. Let sit for 5 minutes.

Lightly coat a griddle or skillet over medium high heat with canola oil spray or a generous pat of butter (or both) and heat. Add bread slices and cook until browned on both sides, a few minutes per side.

Serve with maple syrup and a light dusting of powdered sugar, if desired.

source: inspired and adapted from How Sweet It Is who adapted it from Bobby Flay